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Creating Your Perfect Adoptive Parent Profile

considering adoptionOne of the most important step in the adoption process for any prospective parent is the creation of an adoptive parent profile. This document is essential to create a successful connection with a birth mother who is considering placing her child for adoption. This means that your adoptive parent profile needs to be created in a way which is compelling and true. 

With this in mind, in this article, we will take a close look at the adoptive parent profile and learn some pro tips to ensure your profile stands out from the crowd and increases your chances of being connected for adoption. 

What is an adoptive parent profile?
An adoptive parent profile is sometimes called a “Dear birth mother” letter. This document is essential in the domestic adoption processes. It is created by the adoptive parents so that a birth mother can get to know you. It’s like a first date to get to know you on paper. The document needs to introduce you, your family, your lifestyle, your interests, as well as your thoughts and feelings on parenting and adoption. The profile is usually around 1500 words and should include photos and also create an emotional connection between you and the birth mother. By the time she’s finished reading and viewing your profile, she will know if you share her goals.

Key Points to Consider
There are two key points to consider when writing your adoptive parent profile:

  • Who is the intended audience?
  • What do they want to know?

The Intended Audience
This is question may seem straightforward at first. You are writing for an expectant mother who is thinking about placing her child. However, when investigating further, you’ll start to consider other factors, such as her emotions and the uncertainty she might be feeling, her apprehension surrounding the adoption process, or her difficult situation. The birth family may also be struggling to come to terms with the prospect of adoption, too. In your writing, you should try to reassure the birth mother that you and your family are good people who want the best for their child. 

Be careful, however, to keep your reassurances general, as you don’t want to assume details of the birth mother’s life. Be sure to keep your writing both free of expectations and judgement.

What to Share

At the heart of an adoption, the birth mother simply wants what is best for their baby. They need to be reassured that placing their child with you is the best option, and that their child will be raised in a loving and enriching environment. Create a sense of assurance within your profile to help allay her worries.

You should also try to stand out. Think about what makes you or your family unique. Afterall, your prospective birth mother may read multiple parent profiles. Do you have a strong background in education? Do you live in a brilliant location for raising kids? Have you adopted before or do you have biological children?

Finally, discuss the type of adoption you are looking for: open, closed, semi-open, and the level of contact with the birth mother you’d be open to. By covering all of these points, the birth mother will be able to start to see how their child might be perfectly raised by you.